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Discussion Starter #1
Have seen and heard of alot of you guys talking about stablizers. What do they do exactly? Are they for vibration dampning, or are they for something else?
 

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Stabiliser seems to be yet another term for a steering damper.
Probably because so many people can't work out if a damper should be a dampner or dampener :)
I'm not aware of any manufacturer using the term stabiliser though (or dampener or dampner of course).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
what is its the function? Im a pretty simple person so you have to spell it out for me sorry. lol I was wondering if its good enough to put on the bike for a performance upgrade.
 

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It's only an upgrade if you find yourself getting "Headshake" where your bars go side to side really fast. I don't have a damper and I don't have a problem most the time, only get it if I've got it wide open and hit a bump without having my weight over the tank
 

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what is its the function? Im a pretty simple person so you have to spell it out for me sorry. lol I was wondering if its good enough to put on the bike for a performance upgrade.
depends on how serious of a rider you are .. are you rocking the throttle pretty hard alot of the time.. it's right up there with suspension and power commander.. i think it's a necessaty on the 929/954.. on the 1000rr's they all came with one from the factory.. some people still replace those for an aftermarket one. so yes it's worth it.. if you ever get a tank slapper you'll find out why..
 

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Discussion Starter #7
so what is a power commander and what does that do? Also are the dampers hard to install. Im pretty hands on and am working on my bike right now.
 

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The PC is a tuning tool that stays on the bike and allows you to tune the fuel injection mapping (and ignition mapping on some models) to optimise any modifications you have.
 

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Not really.
The modern ones are a simple USB connection to a laptop or PC and you upload or modify various maps you want to try.
The maps are downloadable from the website and for general road use you should be able to find something reasonably close.
If you want optimal performance from it then you'd want to custom tune your own map usually on a dyno.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
how hard is it to do a tune up on a cbr. I have mine appart right now tank off and all the cowels(not sure if thats spelled right). fixing some other stuff. the bike has 16400 on it and not sure if its ever been done. going to change the oil might even the cooling fluid. have you ever done that before?
 

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the haynes manual is a fantastic one, it shows step by step down to taking out individual bolts. it's a great learning tool, that i've used several times already.. it's also got a recomended service schedule..
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I have a honda service manual its detailed as hell. If i didnt have that i would be where im at right now. I havnt looked at it for a tune up just the stator and rr right now. have to replace those they bad.
 

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going to change the oil might even the cooling fluid. have you ever done that before?
Between all my cars and bikes I do about a dozen oil changes a year and probably half a dozen coolant changes.
I'd recommend changing the oil and filter, coolant, air filter and brake fluid as all of these have a very limited life so need regular replacement anyway.
The fork oil has quite likely never been replaced so I'd recommend doing that at some point as well.
The spark plugs should be done fairly soon and while you are in there I'd recommend pulling the valve cover off to measure the valve clearances and noting them in the back of your manual. That way when you check them next time you can see how much they're tightening up and work out when they'll be near the minimum clearances.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
how do you replace the fork oil? I know that the right side fork is wheeping a little. I would like to take them out and have the seals done. How hard is it to take the forks out my self? Also whats the easiest way to drain the radiator fluid and brake fluid?. As far as the clearance on the valves, how would i measure those and crank them over? In order to do all this how much farther do i need to tear the bike down? right now I have the cowels off and the tank. I guess I can go read the manual it should tell me. I would just like to know from some one with expierience to let me know how long it will take. Now will the manual explain about the valves and the clearance?
 

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To remove the forks first remove the axle, wheel, calipers and guard.
Loosen the clamp bolts on the upper clamp and clip-ons.
Then loosen the fork cap.
Then hold the fork and loosen the lower clamp bolts and the fork will drop out. Remove the fork cap (I now measure the air gap so I know whether I want to alter it) and hang the fork upside down to drain. Stroke the damper several times to release the last bit of oil.
Follow the manual to disassemble for seal replacement.
While you have the tubes out give them a polish and check them for straightness.

To drain the coolant, remove the caps of the radiator and overflow tank and remove the drain bolts from the water pump and front of the cylinders (mine are lock-wired). When it's drained put the garden hose into the radiator and turn it up until the radiator is full and then turn it down again so as to keep the level in the radiator while it is flowing out of the drain bolts and let it run for a few minutes until it's perfectly clean water coming out.
Put the drain bolts back in and slowly pour coolant in the radiator until it's full and then top up the overflow tank to the line. Start the engine and let it warm up until the thermostat opens and then Blip the throttle a few times to knock out any bubbles of air. Top up the levels in the radiator and overflow tank if needed, put the radiator cap back on and let the bike warm up for a few minutes before shutting it off. When it cools down check the levels and top them up if needed.

To check the valve clearances you need to remove the airbox and the valve cover. You can remove the PAIR system and/or gut the airbox and/or replace the plugs while you're in this far if you want to. You'll need feeler gauges to measure the clearances and I use a micrometer to check the feeler gauges as well. Remove the circular cover on the RHS engine cover and use a 14mm socket to turn the motor clockwise. Turn the crank to the timing mark and check the clearance on the valves specified in the manual - basically the valves that have lobes pointing upwards. Turn the crank 360 degrees and check the remaining valves. WRITE DOWN THE CLEARANCES AND THE MILEAGE IN YOUR MANUAL!

Clearances are INTAKE 0.13-0.19mm EXHAUST 0.24-0.30mm.
Usually a shop will set them to maximum spec so they don't need to be done as often. First put a rag over the entire top of the engine so you can just pull back the bit you need to measure the valve you're doing. You don't want anything to drop into the engine. You should already have the throttle bodies covered from when you removed the airbox.
Put 0.13mm of feeler strips in the gap. If they go in fine put 0.14mm in and so on until it's too tight to go in. Your clearance is the last one that does fit. For accuracy I measure them with a micrometer. Measure them all and write them down along with the current mileage. Number one is the LHS of the bike, number eight is the RHS of the bike. Next time you check them you can compare them to now and calculate when they're going to be close to the minimum spec as the valves stretch.
If any of them are at minimum spec or less then you'll need to replace some shims which involves removing the cams.
When removing cams it's important to undo the bolts progressively so as not to bend or break a camshaft or warp the holders. Before removing them turn the crank to put number one cylinder on TDC of the compression stroke and confirm the marks on the sprockets are pointing outwards and are aligned with the top of the head. Then remove the tensioner. You need a small flat-bladed screwdriver to reinstall it. Undo the cam holder bolts progressively until the tension is off the cams. When you remove the cams tie the camchain up to stop it dropping down the cam tunnel.
Use a strong magnet to pull each lifter bucket out carefully to ensure you don't drop the shim out. DO NOT MIX THE BUCKETS UP as they may be different thicknesses which will throw out your previous measurements. Number them or put them into numbered ziploack bags with their shims.
Although the shims are numbered, for accuracy check them with a micrometer and write them down.
Then it's a matter of basic maths to shuffle around the shims you have to re-set the clearances. Then you can make a list of any further shims you need to order. If you make a note of the shim thicknesses you have in there then next time you have to do the shims you can simply lift the cover, measure the clearances and calculate beforehand which shims you need to order to make the job a _lot_ quicker. If you regularly check and record the clearances and know what shims are in there you can even calculate what shims you're likely to need before you even check the clearances.
If you can't get the right shims or want absolute perfection you can very carefully grind the shims down.
Make sure the shims are fully seated on the valves and reassemble everything.
Pull the camchain tight up the front of the engine and wrap it around the sprockets ensuring the crank and sprockets are all aligned. Then install the tensioner and release the spring.
Turn the crank through several revolutions and check that the timing marks are all still correctly aligned.
Check and record the clearances again to ensure everything is correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all that. So I should mesure them even with just normal driving. I dont do the track. Im not planning on racing the bike. I do like working on it though and this sounds like fun. Im for sure going to change all the fluid out. How hard is it to do the seals on the forks? Is that some thing I could do my self or is it some thing that I should have a shop do for me? The other ? on the forks is if I have one side done should I just have both of them done?

For the mesurements on the valves what tools will I need. Im getting them as I go along working on my bike.
Also what is the best type of bike jack for this project? Right now the bike sits on the kick stand. I would like to get some type of jack though. Other thing is money. Dont have alot of it so I want to make the most of what i get.
 

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Checking valve clearances is a normal part of routine maintenance whether riding on the road or track. If they ever manage to design cam lobes and lifters that wear at the same rate that valves stretch then I guess we'd never have to check clearances again :)
When I raced my '90 GSXR750 I checked and re-set my valve clearances every month (boring!) but that has rocker arms that tend to loosen up rather than tighten.
Racing tends to compress the mileage (what wears out on a road bike at 20,000 miles might wear out on a racebike at 15,000 miles) but racebikes tend to be better maintained than many road bikes so I wouldn't consider a racebike to be any more "worn" than a road bike as a general rule.

Like most things fork seals aren't difficult if you follow the manual and have some patience when things don't seem to be working as they should.
You don't have to do both forkseals if one is fine. On my '98 GSXR750 I have replaced one seal twice and the other is still fine. They don't usually go bad as a pair.

For valve clearances all you really need is feeler gauges. Treat them like the precision tools they are, clean and lube them after use and store them properly and they'll last forever. I find after some use the markings on them are difficult to read and they can tend to stick together so I always use them with a micrometer.

I would recommend a race stand and swingarm bobbins for security while working on the bike but it's not essential. Engine stands under the footpegs work well too. With a race stand you can tie the front of the bike up to the garage roof to do the forks. You can thread a rope down through the steering head and tie the end to something that can't pull back through or, if you have the tank and airbox off you can tie to the bar that runs between the frame spars.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
where can i find the feeler guages and a micrometer? would any automotive store have them? The bike stands not sure where to get. Ive seen bike jacks around here but no stands. Where would you recomend I get on at?
 
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