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Discussion Starter #1
The fuse for my blinkers and brake light keeps blowing. No kidding it lasts about 5 mins and than blows again.

I have an 01 929 and when I put the full system on I terminated the O2 sensor wires with a 330 resistor (as per a topic from way back when) That took care of the blinking Fi light but now the damn fuse keeps blowing. I can't think of anything else that I might have done that would cause this, because the O2 sensor is on a different circut. I put on short stalk blinks (never had a problem) and I didn't even mess with the tail lights. Only other thing I can think of is the blinker over the pipe (Hindle High Mount) is too close and the heat is causing the problem, but I'm just stumped. Any ideas? :idunno:
 

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Heat isn't likely to cause the problem unless you melted through a wire. Sounds like a short to me too.
 

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I know one of my buddies hooked his flush mounts up himself and he had one of the wires wrong on the right front bliner(cant remember which one). Well the lights worked for a while and then all of a sudden the light decided to melt itself. It was pretty funny to see a melted aluminum blinker, Lockhart Phillips replaced for free, and I fixed the wiring so it works fine now,I'd just check the wires.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
How can I trace down the short? Excuse my ignorance :D

Thanks Guys
 

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the non-scientific approach. disconnect all of the turnsignals and brake light. reconnect them one at a time until you find the culprit. then proceed to find out why that single component is failing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Will do! I was thinking maybe it was a bit more complicated than that..... Thanks
 

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Disconnect the Positive lead from the battery.
Using an Ohmmeter, attach one lead to ground and check the positive lead on all components that use the suspected circuit one at a time. Once you find the lead that is grounded, go to where it plugs into the main harness. Disconnect the plug and check that same wire on the main harnesses plug. If you don't have continuity anymore, the problem is between the component and the main harness. If it still has continuity, you must follow the wire to the next connector. Keep doing this until you find the short.
 

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Ned's method is much better. Doing it the "guess and check" way can lead to a fire.
 
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