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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Had a 93 900RR streetfighter over 25years ago. Now im 51 and I want to build another. Here in NZ (just moved here) there are very limited numbers. I was going for a CBR1000RR (2009) but the seller is pissing me about. So there are two other immaculate 900rr bikes for sale ... A 95 and a 98 both with less than 35000 miles on clock. No damaged one here as they seem to go straight to scrapper. Ive read the 98 has a softer power delivery. Im interested in the bottom to mid range so maybe the 98 is a bad choice ?.
 

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Hi and welcome.

My 'specialising' is in the later model Blades from the fuel injected 929s onwards. There are many on here who will offer you a precise opinion, but my vague knowledge tells me you'd not notice a lot of difference between those bikes.

Which ever bike you'd choose, you'd more than likely be able to achieve what you want through sprocket changes.(y)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hi and welcome.

My 'specialising' is in the later model Blades from the fuel injected 929s onwards. There are many on here who will offer you a precise opinion, but my vague knowledge tells me you'd not notice a lot of difference between those bikes.

Which ever bike you'd choose, you'd more than likely be able to achieve what you want through sprocket changes.(y)
I read the ecu had a different map and 5th and 6th gears were higher than previous models. Trying to determine if its just a case of using an earlier ecu to change to make it as aggressive as the earlier models.
 

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I read the ecu had a different map and 5th and 6th gears were higher than previous models. Trying to determine if its just a case of using an earlier ecu to change to make it as aggressive as the earlier models.
The 'ECU' is applicable to bikes with fuel injection and able to be 'mapped' to change fuel delivery measurements and counteract the effect of differing combustion chamber pressures due to exhaust changes and the like.

The normally aspirated bikes (carburettor) of the 95 and 98 bikes do not have an ECU and therefore unable to be mapped. What you might be thinking of is the sometimes incorrectly referred CDI unit (capacitor discharge ignition) which really function as a spark control unit.

There is a minor gearing difference between the two. They might be negligible though, given the 893cc versus 918cc capacity difference.

Two links here, from the bible of motorcycle stats:


 

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Discussion Starter #5
The 'ECU' is applicable to bikes with fuel injection and able to be 'mapped' to change fuel delivery measurements and counteract the effect of differing combustion chamber pressures due to exhaust changes and the like.

The normally aspirated bikes (carburettor) of the 95 and 98 bikes do not have an ECU and therefore unable to be mapped. What you might be thinking of is the sometimes incorrectly referred CDI unit (capacitor discharge ignition) which really function as a spark control unit.

There is a minor gearing difference between the two. They might be negligible though, given the 893cc versus 918cc capacity difference.

Two links here, from the bible of motorcycle stats:


Yes of course. Its been a long time since I had any carbed bikes. Im guessing the frame mounts/ locations didnt change from 92 to 99 ? as for purposes of changing swing arms etc...
 
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