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Jacket.
Specifications
  • Heat Microwire® Heat Technology
  • Source 12-volts DC
  • Current 6.4 amps
  • Watts 77 watts
  • Surface Temp 135°F +/- 5°F at 32°F
Gerbing Heated Trouser Liner

Specifications
  • Heat Microwire®
  • Source 12-volts DC
  • Current 3.6 amps
  • Watts 44 watts
  • Surface Temp 125°F +/- 5°F at 32°F
These are just power consumption amount, i sure some one will be able to give the answer to the question using the above info
 

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So exactly how many "gee-whiz" pieces of electronics will your bike power? Well that depends on a few variables. Basically, your bikes excess electrical capacity is the alternators charging output minus the common operating load. Usually these numbers are shown in "watts".
A "watt" is a unit of measure for electrical power (P). In this case, the charging power is the product of the bikes voltage (V) and peak current (I). So P = V * I. What this mean? Simple... if the bikes alternator has a peak rating of 20 amps @ 14 volts then the peak charging output is (20 * 14) or 280 watts.
A motorcycles electrical system consists of three major parts, the alternator, the regulator-rectifier and the battery. The alternator is responsible for producing the power to keep the battery charged and power all of the electrical loads. The regulator-rectifier converts the alternator output from un-useable AC power to useable 14.4 VDC. The battery is used to both start the bike and buffer the power from the alternator.




Visit here..
Calculating Excess Electrical Capacity - Learning Center - Powerlet Products
 
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