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Discussion Starter #1
So when I get home from work or a ride my last mile is always stop and go and the bike gets HOT 215*F+.

When I pull my bike in the garage I would like the fan to run to cool the bike down and then just shut off when the temp reaches the predetermined "Fan Off" temperature even though the key is in the off position or even locked.

Has anyone done this. Should just be a simple splice / half-tap. Any real good reasons NOT to do this?
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
What is the harm in having the fan on to cool the bike quicker? I always thought it was dumb when I pull into my driveway and the fan is running, it's running for a reason to cool the radiator / motor, I hit my kill switch or turn off the key and the fan stops. Is the motor instantly cool? NO, it's still hot as hell and getting hotter.
 

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Yeah, the coolant is barely moving at that point, and fans draw lots of current from your little MC batt.

It's fine dude, don't worry about it.
 

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its possible to install a manual switch for the fan, however it wouldnt make that much of a difference. You bike will be fine without it
 

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Plus that doesn't cool the engine off that just cools the coolant in the radiator and your battery will die. You might be able to put a resistor in line with the sensor to make it think it is hotter than it is so your fan comes on earlier but I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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rocket954 said:
Plus that doesn't cool the engine off that just cools the coolant in the radiator and your battery will die. You might be able to put a resistor in line with the sensor to make it think it is hotter than it is so your fan comes on earlier but I wouldn't worry about it.
Unfortunately adding a resistor inline won't help as the temp sensor closes at a certain temperature like your thermostat. The only other options to get your fan to turn on earlier is to use a manual switch (already recommended - it's a ground circuit which makes it easy) or get a different temperature sensor which would probably be a bit pricey if they even exist. Maybe you could cross reference the sensor (threads) with an automotive sensor. Would have to be a normally open sensor. Beyond that you would have to find the correct thread pitch, and the temperature desired.
 

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freq said:
What is the harm in having the fan on to cool the bike quicker? I always thought it was dumb when I pull into my driveway and the fan is running, it's running for a reason to cool the radiator / motor, I hit my kill switch or turn off the key and the fan stops. Is the motor instantly cool? NO, it's still hot as hell and getting hotter.
If you're that worried about it get an electric fan and let it blow on the radiator. Save yourself alot of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The fan will shut itself off once the temp reaches ~215 or so, using the same switched hot that turns itself on. That fan will only run for about 5 minute or so before it shuts off, it WILL NOT kill my battery.

I have just been leaving the ignition and kill switch on to let the fan do its job while I take off my gear and pull the machine into the garage. But doing it this way leaves the headlight(s) on and I cannot lock the ignition either.
 

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freq said:
The fan will shut itself off once the temp reaches ~215 or so, using the same switched hot that turns itself on. That fan will only run for about 5 minute or so before it shuts off, it WILL NOT kill my battery.

I have just been leaving the ignition and kill switch on to let the fan do its job while I take off my gear and pull the machine into the garage. But doing it this way leaves the headlight(s) on and I cannot lock the ignition either.
You should be able to run a wire directly from you battery or fuse block to the positive wire of the fan. This will enable the circuit to always be hot regardless of your ignition position. If the 1000rr is the same as the 929/954, they use the temp sensor to ground the circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Jake said:
You should be able to run a wire directly from you battery or fuse block to the positive wire of the fan. This will enable the circuit to always be hot regardless of your ignition position. If the 1000rr is the same as the 929/954, they use the temp sensor to ground the circuit.

Ah, no. This would work off of the existing Fan Temp Switch if that's what it is called.
 

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freq said:
Ah, no. This would work off of the existing Fan Temp Switch if that's what it is called.
Not sure what you mean by this. If you run a positive wire from the battery to the fan positive, the ground from the fan through the temp sensor (normally open until it reaches around 220 F then it closes), it should work. When the temp sensor closes (around 220 F) this will ground the circuit and the fan will turn on regardless of the key position.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
After thought: If the key is in the "Off" position all sensors will be "Off" also. You are correct, I would HAVE to have a manual switch or run a parellel fan temp switch in line with the original one.

I remember / know some of my Honda cars in the past would run the fan after the car was shut off.
 

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freq said:
After thought: If the key is in the "Off" position all sensors will be "Off" also. You are correct, I would HAVE to have a manual switch or run a parellel fan temp switch in line with the original one.

I remember / know some of my Honda cars in the past would run the fan after the car was shut off.
Remember the temp switch acts similar to a thermostat, except instead of normally closed (thermostat) the switch is normally open, but will close once it reaches a certain temperature. When the switch closes, it grounds the circuit acting as a switch in the circuit. Therefor, if you have constant power (i.e. running a wire to the positive wire of the fan from the battery), when your sensor reaches a certain temperature it will close the circuit, turning the fan on. It is no different than the way it is currently wired except your positive wire for the fan is currently connected to a key on ignition source. What I explain will bypass this and still allow your fan to work properly when the bike is running and even when the bike key is in the off position. Keep in mind that the sensor will open and close regardless of a wire being connected to it, just as a thermostat would.
I wish I could draw a schematic for you, it would save explaining and you would be able to visually see what I'm trying to explain.
 

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Currently you have a wire coming from the fuse block (which receives power only when the key is in the on position). This wire from the fuse block feeds into the positive wire for the fan. The negative wire from the fan goes to your temp sensor located in your radiator. Your radiator is bolted to your frame, therefor is ground. This is the best I can do for explaining the circuit.
By routing another wire from your battery (recommend using an inline fuse) to the positive on your fan, you will have the same circuit without requiring you key to be on.
Hopefully it helps.
 

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Bottom line....there is no practical advantage to this...without running...the water pump will not circulate the coolant...so cooling off just the radiator will make no difference....

to wire the fan hot all the time will serve no purpose other than to wear out the fan sooner...there is enough airflow while moving to cool the radiator
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Jake said:
Currently you have a wire coming from the fuse block (which receives power only when the key is in the on position). This wire from the fuse block feeds into the positive wire for the fan. The negative wire from the fan goes to your temp sensor located in your radiator. Your radiator is bolted to your frame, therefor is ground. This is the best I can do for explaining the circuit.
By routing another wire from your battery (recommend using an inline fuse) to the positive on your fan, you will have the same circuit without requiring you key to be on.
Hopefully it helps.
Jake, THANKS.

Finally somebody who came here to answer my question not question me. :thumb:

Thanks again. You're explanation makes all the sense in the world. I am not worried about my battery dying (battery tender once a week), not worried about my fan dying prematurely. Would just like to cool the machine down a little bit quicker.

Now I just have to double check everything you suggested before I proceed. ;)
 

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Another solution would be to run a second fan - the OEM fan is not centred - you could run this second fan manually. Just flip it on with a switch 'X' miles/temp/minutes from work/home/school to draw additional air thru your rad. Could be used in hot stop/go traffic as well.

Cheers
 

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some Kawi's still have the fan on for a little bit after the key is removed from the bike. maybe you could look at them to see how its wired.
 
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