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I’ll suggest you do a thorough estimate of parts that you might need to replace and time investment before proceeding any further. Projects like this aren’t for the front of heart and I get the impression you’d be better served with a newer bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I’ll suggest you do a thorough estimate of parts that you might need to replace and time investment before proceeding any further. Projects like this aren’t for the front of heart and I get the impression you’d be better served with a newer bike.
I'm not really too worried. Regardless of the bike I got, it was most likely that I'd be doing about 80% of the things I will be doing. I like starting mostly new with any car/bike purchase (in terms of maintenance schedule). I can't really trust the maintenance schedule of the previous person.

The only thing that would be off putting is if the engine or transmission was completely toast. At that point, I don't think I could do much with the bike because some of those parts aren't available OR they're ridiculously expensive. ($750 for a new crankshaft - ow) I mean, if I need a new crankshaft or pistons or something major besides new rings then the whole engine would require blueprinting and then finding out the entire thing is either toast or would require $1000+ in machining *plus* all new parts - and I have to pray after machining I can even use any of the OEM parts. Not worth it - for me. That's the scenario where either I get really gung-ho about this bike and try to buy a used engine (eh) or just part it out instead. I haven't registered the bike yet so I'm not in the hole much financially.

Right now, I'm mostly just trying to get it running AND if it doesn't run then I want to make sure I can part out the bike. In this case, the fuel tank is in what appears to be wonderful condition (internally at least!) and if I was to sell it to someone, I should remove the fuel cap anyway. And since I wanted new keys for every lock, I decided to buy the kit. I could've waited on that and just tried to hotwire the thing but I'm impatient and it's only $29. It'll probably arrive around the same time the battery does. Replacing the ignition seems easier than trying to hotwire and potentially messing up. So, it's done. :)

I'm not too worried abut this overall. I knew going in that it had potential to be a very intense project *or* that I'd have to part out the bike. Either is fine with me. Learning experience either way. ;)

For reference, I had read this: https://jalopnik.com/im-going-to-overhaul-this-legendary-honda-cbr900rr-with-1819709178 and then https://jalopnik.com/heres-exactly-what-it-cost-to-rebuild-a-1993-honda-cbr9-1819487774 . And that was with a quite pristine bike in most terms. My expectations were pretty low going in. I mean, the fuel tank is already *way* better than I expected. The oil didn't look black - and it makes sense the guy was probably religious about that with tracking the bike.

I'll be doing some more inspection today and trying to remove all the fairings.

Fun fact: Never knew that gun-ho (that's how I've always heard it and interpreted it as a gun/trigger-happy kind of thing) is actually gung-ho and is Chinese. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gung-ho
 

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Discussion Starter #44
I’ve just bought a genuine CBR600 petcock assembly from Everett Powersports in the USA, they’re on eBay and seem to stock a lot of OEM stuff for our era of bikes. Price, even including a customs charge was much cheaper than here in the U.K.
I didn't see much for '93 cbr900rr'. Great deals from Everett Powersports PARTS IN STOCK | eBay stores

I'll probably buy off ebay if I have to. My question is: Is the fuel strainer going to be necessary if I have a fuel filter? From looking at the fuel lines, it doesn't seem like there is an inline fuel filter but maybe I haven't been paying attention. :p

Yet, there are these parts online for a fuel filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
A tip from somebody who has put a lot of little metal shavings into their fuel tank and can't get all the distilled water out even with a lot of shaking. Stuff a couple old t-shirts inside. Shake it up a lot. Use *very long* pliers to get them out if you have to. Alternatively, put only one in at a time but leaving a little bit out so that you can hold onto it.

That won't get all the metal shavings out, just most of the water+gasoline+whatever mixture.

Next up, use old microfiber towels that you don't want anymore (I use to have more of these but couldn't find a good use until now). Stuff those inside, shake whole fuel tank vigorously. I mean, very vigorously, you're trying to make the stuff stick to the microfiber. You'll hear the metal go from moving around inside to suddenly silent. Pull microfiber out after a minute or two of shaking. Should be covered in metal shavings. Microfiber is a *very* grippy material. It'll grab up those large and small metal shavings and just keep them locked in. Pull the shavings off of the towels after retrieving them. Repeat until you feel it's clean enough inside.

That's what I did and it was very effective. Maybe just spraying the inside with *a lot* of water from the hose really does the trick but I didn't feel like potentially causing rust inside the tank or trying to get even more water out of the thing.
 

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I didn't see much for '93 cbr900rr'. Great deals from Everett Powersports PARTS IN STOCK | eBay stores

I'll probably buy off ebay if I have to. My question is: Is the fuel strainer going to be necessary if I have a fuel filter? From looking at the fuel lines, it doesn't seem like there is an inline fuel filter but maybe I haven't been paying attention. :p

Yet, there are these parts online for a fuel filter.
I believe it is necessary, because of the way it articulates with the fuel valve. There is an O-ring around the outside of it that seals it to the inside of the threaded tap out of tank.

You can just about see the small groove in the inside base of the valve. Also, yes there is a fuel filter, but it’s only there to strain the sediment that the fuel pump produces. The later models 96-99 only use the in tank strainer, as Honda went to a gravity feed from the tank.

You’ll also hear that many guys (myself included) delet/remove the fuel pump all together. It works. Both the 93’s that I’ve owned had no fuel pump. Never had any type of fuel starvation, or dying with fuel still in the tank.

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Discussion Starter #48
Turning the engine finally. Got confused about what was the crank cover. Started unbolting what I think is the clutch cover and I was like, "How does this work? Shouldn't the crankshaft be ... over there????"

And then after a short moment I looked it up in the manual and was like, "Oh, yeah, this makes more sense..." Removing the crankshaft hole cap after applying some PB blaster and letting it sit (it was *on*). Then turned the crank with a 14mm deep socket on a 9" long 1/2" wrench.

Anyway, turned it over. It didn't take "excessive" force but it did take some force with a 10" long wrench. Probably from not being lubed up but also from it almost always being in a compression stroke on some cylinder. It isn't 100% equal force when turning it. There are some times when it is easier but I think that's just from going to hitting the hardest part of the compression stroke to hitting the easiest part of the power stroke. Yes, should've put some oil down the cylinders but it looks like it takes quite a bit of work to get access to the spark plugs and be able to drop oil down the holes. This was quicker and it was just to see if it could even turn. It does turn. You can even hear air exit the valves.
 

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Turning the engine finally. Got confused about what was the crank cover. Started unbolting what I think is the clutch cover and I was like, "How does this work? Shouldn't the crankshaft be ... over there????"

And then after a short moment I looked it up in the manual and was like, "Oh, yeah, this makes more sense..." Removing the crankshaft hole cap after applying some PB blaster and letting it sit (it was *on*). Then turned the crank with a 14mm deep socket on a 9" long 1/2" wrench.

Anyway, turned it over. It didn't take "excessive" force but it did take some force with a 10" long wrench. Probably from not being lubed up but also from it almost always being in a compression stroke on some cylinder. It isn't 100% equal force when turning it. There are some times when it is easier but I think that's just from going to hitting the hardest part of the compression stroke to hitting the easiest part of the power stroke. Yes, should've put some oil down the cylinders but it looks like it takes quite a bit of work to get access to the spark plugs and be able to drop oil down the holes. This was quicker and it was just to see if it could even turn. It does turn. You can even hear air exit the valves.
Well, that post sounds very encouraging! Keep us updated every step of the way!:patriot::thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Tried to fire it up today. Poured some gas in. No go.

Decided there was probably something gumming up the carbs or the fuel line. Either way, needed to take off some stuff. Decided to try removing the gas tank, air box, and carbs... but I'm stuck at removing the carbs. I can't get them to come off. I'm following the steps in a 93 CBR900RR service manual but I honestly have no idea how you're supposed to get this thing off. It says to loosen the screws for the adapters that pipe gas+fuel into the valves from the carb assembly but... honestly, those are super hard to reach (even though I have managed, no idea how I'm get them tight again!) but the carbs still won't come off! I've done the other steps too and I'm not sure how you're supposed to get the throttle cable off. It's all very weird.
 

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Discussion Starter #51 (Edited)
Step 6 here is where I'm stuck. Not like I can really do #3 here either. I honestly don't get how they expect you to. The wire looks to be self connecting? (looking on the bike, I can see how it's 2 separate parts but no idea how you disconnect them with this little reach...)

https://imgur.com/a/zfam3
 

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Leave the throttle cables attached to the carbs, their easier to take off once you have the carbs pulled off, if you can reach just the clips that attach the carbs to the insulators ,just unscrew those, the idle screw is attached to the carbs so leave that as well, they can get really set and need a lot of persuasion to come off:wink
 

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The easiest way I’ve found to get them out is to undo only the lower clamp on the insulators, leaving the top ones tight, thus when you start to get them to release from the head, they stay attached to the carbs. Once they’re off the head, manipulate them to undo the throttle cables, then they’re free. After sitting so long I’m sure the insulators have vulcanized themselves and will be hard like a hockey puck. A heat gun or blow dryer may help soften them up to get them moving. As long as they were installed correctly, a long Phillips head should be able to reach two clamps from each side of the bike.

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Discussion Starter #54 (Edited)
They're rubber, right? So I should be able to use some silicone lubricant and that might be able to sneak its way around to get them off easier?

I'll try using a heatgun tonight if I can.

Since I am taking these off and going to be "essentially" rebuilding them (minus the part where I have new parts) should I actually just buy new parts? I'm sure the carbs would sell on the parts market if this bike doesn't start after rebuilding.

EDIT: This is something else that I am curious about. This is a CA bike. So it has all the CA special tubes and what not. I can't tell if they're actually hooked up though. I think the previous owner removed some of the CA emissions stuff. Would this the bike to run a little weird? I don't think the charcoal canister is on the bike is what I am saying.
 

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Typically the CA stuff just redirects fresh air into the exhaust, and sends crankcase gasses into the combustion chamber/charcoal canister. As you said, some might be on, some might be off. Shouldn’t keep it from firing up though. If needed, I’m sure can delete most of it once you get it running. There should be some steel tubing that attaches just abouve the header. If you remove those, you’ll need to block the now open ports.

They are rubber, but over time they harden to the point of uselessness. I replaced them on my 99 and 93. Silicone lubricant can get in there sometimes, but generally not enough to help you. Try not to melt them though lol use a low setting or a hair dryer.

Sometimes, when I can’t get a good grip on the carbs I will block both wheels, straddle the bike, and work them front to back. That sometimes does the trick when they haven’t been off in a while. Once you get them off, or get new ones, it will be much easier.

The carbs may be surprisingly clean. Generally the slow jets are what get clogged, but they come out pretty easy and it’s a squirt or two to open the passageways.

Getting an entirely new used set of carbs can be just as easy, but you never know what you’re getting from the WWW.

I’ve dismantled mine on each bike a few dozen times, always clean up and run great.

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Discussion Starter #56
Not sure how you even get a hairdryer or heat gun in there without causing a fire. :|

I've been rocking them back and forth, throwing half a can of silicon lubricant at it, and even using a deadblow hammer (no marring). A little wiggle now but barely anything worth noting.

I guess I'll really put the heat on it now...

EDIT: It feels like I'm about to throw my back out from this crap. Holy cow. I've been pulling *really* hard.
 

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if you plan to replace them the other option is to move the clamp out of the way, take a razor knife and split them length wise over the mount at the head. do not do this with any thing other then a razor knife. your Dremel tool will mar the intake and drop shavings into the head.
 

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Discussion Starter #58
I did try the heatgun last night. Unfortunately, I couldn't really heat up the rubber mounts very well without something in the area starting to smoke. I didn't feel super comfortable using a heatgun near carbs that probably still had some fuel in them anyway...

We'll see if letting the silicone lube soak overnight did anything. But, yes, the alternative is to just straight up cut them up. I've been avoiding that because it's more expensive and time consuming (parts delivery). And I just want to get this thing *running* before buying much more stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
They are *stuck*. I've tried heat gun, blow torch (yes), razor, dead blow hammer on top of carbs (black cap) to dislodge it/shock it free, silicone lube, and pulling like it's Excalibur. Nothing.

No more progress than before. At this point, I'm about to take the blow torch to it and *really* set it on fire. Just melt the whole stuff off. It's obnoxious. These will have to be replaced at this point. Just trying to minimize the damage to other parts. I've accidentally broken some plastic pieces because they got in the way while trying to pull these off and they just snapped apart.

I've spent like 2-3 hours trying to get these off.

I'd just cut all the metal ties and strip the rubber down but I have so little clearance for such maneuvers that I can't. Barely can get the blow torch under the carbs to heat the rubber up. Heat gun doesn't work well enough. (too slow and not concentrated)
 
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