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Got them off finally. Blow torch. Used a natural gas torch (Mappro would've probably been too much). Just kept going over all four carbs rubber gasket from the bottom with the torch, pressing down with my body weight on the top of the carbs to slowly peel them away from the engine... Took a few minutes of fire+whatever. Eventually the rubber and everything stopped catching fire and just gave in to my ways.

slowly got it... but the things are super hot to the touch. Glad I have mechanic gloves, otherwise my hands would've gotten burned to a crisp.

Whew. But now I have gas going everywhere on a very hot surface. D:

I'll take them apart soon enough and figure out what I need to order.

Pics after: https://imgur.com/a/RL7PW

There was nothing I could pry them off with. There's no real leverage point I could use without potentially damaging the carbs themselves or more bits of them or the frame or what not.
That is insane!

I posted this in another thread, but I'll copy and paste here for anyone following:

On my '91 CBR600 they were the same way. I battled by myself for a couple of hours.

Then my stepson came over and showed me how it's done...

1. Disconnect everything that needs disconnecting.
2. Loosen the four clamps (either carb side or head side, whichever is easier. On the CBR600, I believe it was the head side).
3. Need one person on each side of the bike. Interlock your fingers together under each end of the carb assembly, one person on each side of the bike. Wiggle & pull, checking to see that you're pulling at the same angle as the intake port is facing. They will come off.

If you want to soften up the rubber pieces for reassembly, soak them for a few days in a 3:1 mixture of isopropyl alcohol and oil of wintergreen (methyl salicylate). Thread: https://cbrforum.com/forum/cbr-600f3-17/carb-connectors-how-rubbery-157104/

And any rubber parts you would like to preserve and extend the life of (and also make for easier reassembly of the carbs onto these rubber intake insulators), get a tube of this stuff and smear the rubber part with it. I have a Honda auto with a valve cover gasket that has been on the car for 120,000 miles and been removed for valve adjustment 10+ times. Gasket is like new and does not leak. This is great for preserving the rubber carb parts, especially the vacuum piston diaphragm, which is NLA on most of these bikes now. And of course I've found dozens of other uses for the stuff around the house and in the garage.
 

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take a look at racetech before you buy replacements. i send anything i need a rebuild on to them. easy to deal with and i get back a far superior product
 

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Discussion Starter #83
take a look at racetech before you buy replacements. i send anything i need a rebuild on to them. easy to deal with and i get back a far superior product
Well, I'd rather not send anything to anyone considering that'd be very costly. Racetech does seem to potentially offer replacement fork tubes in the catalog.

One question I have is if I should be replacing the springs internally as well as the fork tubes. I figure springs that have been inside for 25 years really would need replacement.
 

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Well, I'd rather not send anything to anyone considering that'd be very costly. Racetech does seem to potentially offer replacement fork tubes in the catalog.

One question I have is if I should be replacing the springs internally as well as the fork tubes. I figure springs that have been inside for 25 years really would need replacement.
I would say yes, and I find that suspension set up is the nemesis of most riders and racers alike, this is why I suggested race tech. fill out their setup questionnaire, send them the forks and shock they will rebuild and tune the set for your riding and send it back. all you have to do is bolt it back in. once you have a good set up on the bike I think you would wonder how you road without having it done. also race tech is less expensive then most others and has a great reputation.
 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
It runs! I got it running. Not a "huge" amount of smoke out the back but definitely quite a bit. Backyard had some smoky haze going on for sure. It backfired when it first almost started. Hahaha.

I can't say why it's running with so much smoke. Maybe worn rings or what not. But, hey, it runs! It does have a bit of a "blue" to the smoke but that could just be my imagination. I did take video and maybe I'll upload that later.

I let it run for about 2-3 minutes before shutting it off. I didn't have the choke or throttle connected so it took some finesse on my part to manually trigger the choke and set the idle correctly.

Woooo!

EDIT: Of course now I can't get it started again. Some kind of perfect storm from before apparently. Hah.
EDIT2: didn't have it on run - had it on off lol. Fired right up. Dork.
EDIT3: Less smoke now. Still not an exhaust you want to breathe in but less smoke.
EDIT4: There was a ticking sound and some vibration associated with it. At one point, I was like, "This thing has to be misfiring or knocking." Similarly, there was some metallic ticking sound with some vibration associated. Sounded like it was coming from the engine area for sure but I couldn't place it between either the crankshaft or the head... Felt like it was the crankshaft but I couldn't say for sure. Sound can travel funny. I have most of the fairings off, so it shouldn't be hard to determine really... but it is. :p
Also, damn is this thing loud! I won't be running it in my backyard much unless I want to disturb the lady in the front of the house. I went inside to check something while it was running and I could /feel/ it. Jeebus.
EDIT5:
 

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May be a seized oil ring, or even a compression ring. Wear should not be a factor with that few miles unless the maintenance was badly ignored. I'd want a compression check of the cylinders in any case. If compression looks good and it's still blowing oil, then you can try what we used to do in the old days with cars:

Break loose all the spark plugs, and re-tighten to where they just seat (goal is so they can be removed quickly).

Warm up the engine.

Shut it off.

Remove the plugs.

Take an oil squirt can filled with ATF (I also know guys used Marvel Mystery Oil, or MMO and ATF mixed) and shoot an ounce or so into each cylinder.

Let it sit for a good 5~6 hours, then cover the plug holes with paper towels and crank the engine to dump the oil out (can be messy). Some say to let it sit for a few days, but if the mixture is draining past the rings and into the crankcase in that time, you'll need to shoot more into the plug holes as that occurs AND change the oil before you fire it up.

Reinstall plugs and fire it up.

Years ago had an old '66 Mustang with 33,000 original miles and stuck rings. Had to repeat this deal 3 times, but eventually it started sealing and stopped burning oil. I hear a more modern version of the ring-freeing trick is to feed the motor Seafoam whilst running the engine (smoke time!) And of course, there's always the 'Seafoam in the crankcase' crowd. Personally, I'd not be afraid to try any of the above.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
If one of the rings (or some) are stuck then it's not going to have good compression. I don't see how it would. I'll try to do a compression test tomorrow since I can warm up the engine now. I'll add a minor amount of MMO to each cylinder as well. I'll do that as part of my "ring wear" test during a compression test. (add oil to each cylinder after doing initial test, see how high it jumps up for each cylinder) Would've done all of this earlier if I could but gotta have the engine warm for a compression test. Honestly, if one of the rings was stuck or something after 4 years of not running, I wouldn't be surprised. The smoke eased as time went on which leads me to thinking it relaxed but we'll see tomorrow when I fire it up. If it smokes a lot then then I'll know it's not just one time flakiness.

I'd like to not have to replace piston rings because that means rebuilding the entire engine (essentially) and some machine work. I live in the bay area so I cannot possibly imagine how much a machinist charges here. Valve seals would be manageable but piston rings seem more likely from my reading of things.

From here it's easy to see some potential reasons for the smoke: https://www.freeasestudyguides.com/exhaust-color.html
 

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I don't know if the 900rr has two compression rings or one, but in either case it's not terribly uncommon to have good compression and bad oil rings. But any time you see oil getting burnt, a compression test is called for.

Leaky valve seals will smoke good on startup and taper off fairly quickly. And I've seen bikes sit for a lot longer with no weird ring issues (if kept indoors). If a bike sat out in the weather for 4 years, all bets are off. And though there's NO harm in the ATF or MMO procedure, sometimes just riding the damn thing with fresh oil and filter will do wonders.

And no one is suggesting an engine teardown at this point. Way too early to be suggesting such a thing. You're still in the information gathering stage.

Flush & fill the coolant ASAP! People talk about oil being the lifeblood of a motor, but coolant is just as important with aluminum engines. You can buy the Honda stuff, or pay about 1/2 that price for something that I think is superior: Link
 

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Discussion Starter #89 (Edited)
I don't know if the 900rr has two compression rings or one, but in either case it's not terribly uncommon to have good compression and bad oil rings. But any time you see oil getting burnt, a compression test is called for.

Leaky valve seals will smoke good on startup and taper off fairly quickly. And I've seen bikes sit for a lot longer with no weird ring issues (if kept indoors). If a bike sat out in the weather for 4 years, all bets are off. And though there's NO harm in the ATF or MMO procedure, sometimes just riding the damn thing with fresh oil and filter will do wonders.

And no one is suggesting an engine teardown at this point. Way too early to be suggesting such a thing. You're still in the information gathering stage.

Flush & fill the coolant ASAP! People talk about oil being the lifeblood of a motor, but coolant is just as important with aluminum engines. You can buy the Honda stuff, or pay about 1/2 that price for something that I think is superior: Link
It's a four stroke engine and I think most four strokes (from my reading) have at least 2 compression rings. https://www.hondapartshouse.com/oemparts/a/hon/506cab36f870023420a401f6/crankshaft

Anyway, I figure the compression rings are the ones that are bad. They're what create the seal and stop blow by getting into the case and also screwing up other stuff like letting oil get into the cylinder and get all burnt up causing blue smoke. ;)

I'll be doing a compression test tonight along with adding MMO as the oil to test whether the rings are completely shot. After doing that, I will also change out the oil and replace the coolant with a good 60/40 mix of distilled water and some off the shelf coolant. Maybe I'll just buy some Prestone 50/50 mix - whatever. I'll flush the radiator with 1-2 gallons of distilled water first though. Reading the manual, it seems they don't care what antifreeze you use. When I opened the radiator cap, it just had clear fluid. Leading me to believe it literally only had distilled water in it. Water was clear... but who knows when I drain it tonight.
 

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I loved the “happy dance”!! Great video, but in my opinion it sounds like it’s running on 3 cylinders.

The next time you have it running, spray some brake cleaner or water on each header down pipe. If each pipe immediately burns it off, they are running ok. If one or more allows the water or brake clean to slowly burn or drool down the pipe, that cylinder is not firing.

I had that problem a few times with my 99, and I chased a dirty #3 carb for a while, then went with the coil stick mod.

Here’s a video of my 3 cylinder running as I was checking the carb sync. See if it’s similar to yours.

 

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I took a peek at the fiche. A '93 RR has two compression rings & an oil ring assy. Some newer race-oriented bikes have a single compression ring and an oil ring assy. to reduce internal friction losses.

The manual may not specify what coolant to use, but Honda bike manuals don't call out specific Honda gear except for special tools needed for assembly or disassembly. I've been working on water-cooled aluminum engines and radiators for 40+ years, and tap water or even distilled water are a no-go. Water is the enemy of aluminum, so the cleaner the better, and mixed with an antifreeze designed to protect aluminum will do an excellent job. Back before 50/50 premixes were common, we used to buy deionized water from a chemical supply shop (was cheap from a local supplier). Nowadays, any 50/50 mix uses demineralized deionized water, much cleaner stuff than any distilled water you can buy from the grocery store (plus, store-bought distilled water is a bit acidic, with a PH of 5 to 5.5). Also, unlike back in 70's, there are coolants specifically designed to protect aluminum engines and radiators. The Valvoline/Zerex Asian coolant is one such coolant, and is what I use & recommend, BUT, really most any 50/50 coolant will get the job done and work fine as long as it is changed every other year (but I'd avoid any Dexcool stuff). I do recommend the best you can find, as cooling systems seem to the the bastard child of maintenance...car/bike runs, so why mess with it? Amazingly common for a car owner to be running a vehicle with 10 year-old coolant. Probably a lot of bike owners as well.

Your motor, your choice. Just providing some info gleaned from fighting cooling system issues for many decades.

(A lot of problems with aluminum radiators & engines can be avoided by eliminating the water altogether and using a waterless coolant. It's not easy to convert to waterless, and it's less easy on the wallet, and the waterless coolant doesn't remove heat quite as well as a 50/50 mix, so radiators, waterpumps, and thermostats must be in good shape. But once done, it never wears out and never needs changing. And because its boiling point is so high, the system now runs close to atmospheric pressure, so a rad cap can be pulled off of a hot motor. Pretty cool. I've not converted a motorcycle to waterless, but the two cars I've done showed no difference in operating temp.)

 

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Discussion Starter #93
The neighbors complained. What can you do. People with $2m homes rule the world, folks. (I rent a little in-law unit in the backyard) Won't be starting the bike up back here much anymore since my landlord doesn't want it back there now because of the complaints. Which is okay - whatever. Always something... they can have their yappy dogs but I start up a motorcycle twice and the world is ending.

Regardless, I don't think a compression test or what not is super necessary at this very moment. There was a little smoke/exhaust coming out of the exhaust headers that I noticed. Probably need new gaskets for the exhaust - not surprising.

Here's the second start (processing as of writing).
 

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Discussion Starter #94
I loved the “happy dance”!! Great video, but in my opinion it sounds like it’s running on 3 cylinders.

The next time you have it running, spray some brake cleaner or water on each header down pipe. If each pipe immediately burns it off, they are running ok. If one or more allows the water or brake clean to slowly burn or drool down the pipe, that cylinder is not firing.

I had that problem a few times with my 99, and I chased a dirty #3 carb for a while, then went with the coil stick mod.

Here’s a video of my 3 cylinder running as I was checking the carb sync. See if it’s similar to yours.
What is the coil stick mod?

What resolved the issue? Calibrating the carbs or cleaning the carbs or something else?
 

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The coil stick mod got rid of the 2 giant old coils and long wires, and replaced them with the newer Fuel injected style “coil on cap” sticks.

I did it to rule out a bad coil, which are archaic by today’s standards. I used 600RR stick coils. Not a perfect fit, bit worked well during her inaugural track day thrashing.

I had the carbs off 3 or 4 times chasing that dead cylinder. The float bowls were filled with a fine rust sediment from a 15 year old fuel filter I stupidly used when runnig it. You can see it in the 2nd video on the fuel line. I finally realized it was sediment in the filter that was accumulating in the bowls. I also had a very miss adjusted butterfly on the same cylinder. It was a comedy of errors, but the sync will be key for your idle, especially if you R and R the carbs a few times.

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FYI, a non-contact laser thermometer is great for checking for a missing cyl. Amazon and Harbor Freight have a dozen or more for under $30, and some for under $20.
 

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Discussion Starter #97 (Edited)
The coil stick mod got rid of the 2 giant old coils and long wires, and replaced them with the newer Fuel injected style “coil on cap” sticks.

I did it to rule out a bad coil, which are archaic by today’s standards. I used 600RR stick coils. Not a perfect fit, bit worked well during her inaugural track day thrashing.

I had the carbs off 3 or 4 times chasing that dead cylinder. The float bowls were filled with a fine rust sediment from a 15 year old fuel filter I stupidly used when runnig it. You can see it in the 2nd video on the fuel line. I finally realized it was sediment in the filter that was accumulating in the bowls. I also had a very miss adjusted butterfly on the same cylinder. It was a comedy of errors, but the sync will be key for your idle, especially if you R and R the carbs a few times.
Is there a place that I can borrow/rent the carb synchronizers? I rather not pay for them since it's a one time in a long time thing.
 

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Is there a place that I can borrow/rent the carb synchronizers? I rather not pay for them since it's a one time in a long time thing.
I don’t know, you’ll have to do some research to see if someone like Autozone, O’Rielly’s, NAPA or another local parts store lends them out. It’s a pretty specific tool for motorcycles, so maybe if you butter the muffin of your local Honda motorcycle shop they’ll let you borrow one (I would hope that their service department has one).
 

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Discussion Starter #100
Replacing the ignition was a bad idea. One: The bolts are very difficult to access. Two: One of them is already stripped. It just started stripping immediately upon trying to loosen. Veeerrry soft bolt.
 
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